Sending Surveys to Your Customer List? Building a House Panel May Be Better

Many times when companies need information quickly, they conduct brief surveys. A single organization may have hundreds of individual accounts with online survey tools like Zoomerang and SurveyMoney, and each of those employees assigned to such an account may send out surveys of his/her own, depending on the needs of his or her department. The respondents for these surveys is most frequently drawn from the customer list, often pulled from an internal database or from the sales force’s contact management software. This can be a bad idea.

Essentially, what is happening here is that there is no designated owner for marketing research – particularly surveys – in these organizations. As a result, everyone takes it upon himself or herself to collect data via a survey. Since many of these departments have no formal training in questionnaire design, sampling theory, or data analysis, they are bound to get biased, useless results. Moreover, not only does the research process degrade, but customers get confused by incorrectly worded questions and overwhelmed by too many surveys in such a short period of time, causing response rates to go down.

In the November 2010 issue of Quirk’s Marketing Research Review, Jeffrey Henning, the founder and vice president of strategy at Vovici, said that companies must first recognize that customer feedback is an asset and then treat it as such. One way to do that would be to build a house panel – a panel developed internally for the organization’s own use.

To do this, there must be a designated panel owner who is responsible for developing the panel. This should fall within the marketing department, and more precisely, the marketing research group. The panel owner must be charged with understanding the survey needs of each stakeholder; the types of information often sought; the customers who are to be recruited to or excluded from the panel; the information to be captured about each panel member; the maintenance of the panel; and the rules governing how often a panelist is to be surveyed, or which panelists get selected for a particular survey. In addition, all surveys should requisitioned by the interested departments to the marketing research group, who can then ensure best practices using the house panel are being followed and that duplication of effort is minimized if not eliminated.

A house panel can take some time to develop. However, house panels are far preferable to dirty, disparate customer lists, as they preserve customers’ willingness to participate in surveys, ensure that surveys are designed to capture the correct information, and make possible that the insights they generate are actionable.

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2 Responses to “Sending Surveys to Your Customer List? Building a House Panel May Be Better”

  1. arjunvasan Says:

    This is an interesting article on how companies can do customer research. Do you think outsourcing this research to customer/market research companies can save costs to these companies? Hiring and forming a panel might cost more to the company?

    • analysights Says:

      Arjunvasan,

      Outsourcing panel research to research firms probably won’t save money in the short-run. Panel development is a costly undertaking. But it’s a good long-term investment, in that it will save companies a lot of time and grief; increase the likelihood they’ll establish the panel correctly; and increase the likelihood of getting reliable survey results. The payoff comes in the value of the insights the panel generates.

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