Forecast Friday Topic: Other Judgmental Forecasting Methods

(Thirty-ninth in a series)

Over the last several weeks, we discussed a series of different non-quantitative forecasting methods: Delphi Method, Jury of Executive Opinion, Sales Force Composite Forecasts, and Surveys of Expectations. In today’s brief post, we’ll finish with a brief discussion of three more judgmental forecasting methods: Scenario Writing, La Prospective, and Cross-Impact Analysis.

Scenario Writing

When a company’s or industry’s long-term future is far too difficult to predict (whose isn’t!), it is common for experts in that company or industry to ponder over possible situations in which the company or industry may find itself in the distant future. The documentation of these situations – scenarios – is known as scenario writing. Scenario writing seeks to get managers thinking in terms of possible outcomes at a future time where quantitative forecasting methods may be inadequate for forecasting. Unfortunately, much literature on this approach suggests that writing multiple scenarios does not have much better quality over any of the other judgmental forecasting methods we’ve discussed to date.

La Prospective

Developed in France, La Prospective eschews quantitative models and emphasizes several potential futures that may result from the activities of individuals. Interaction among several events, many of which can be, and indeed are, dynamic in structure and constantly evolving, are studied and their impacts are cross-analyzed, and their effect on the future is assessed. La Prospective devotes considerable attention to the power, strategies, and resources of the individual “agents” whose actions will influence the future. Because the different components being analyzed can be dynamic, the forecasting process for La Prospective is often not linear; stages can progress in different or simultaneous order. And the company doing the forecasting may also be one of the influential agents involved. This helps companies assess the value of any actions the company might take. After the La Prospective process is complete, scenarios of the future are written, from which the company can formulate strategies.

Cross-Impact Analysis

Cross-Impact analysis seeks to account for the interdependence of uncertain future events. Quite often, a future event occurring can be caused or determined by the occurrence of another event. And often, an analyst may have strong knowledge of one event, and little or no knowledge about the others. For example, in trying to predict the future price of tissue, experts at companies like Kimberly-Clark, along with resource economists, forest experts, and conservationists may all have useful views. If a country that has vast acreages of timber imposes more stringent regulations on the cutting down of trees, that can result in sharp increases in the price of tissue. Moreover, if there is a major increase, or even a sharp reduction, in the incidence of influenza or of the common cold – the realm of epidemiologists – that too can influence the price of tissue. And even the current tensions in the Middle East – the realm of foreign policy experts – can affect the price of tissue. If tensions in the Middle East exacerbate, the price of oil shoots up, driving up the price of the energy required to convert the timber into paper, and also the price of gas to transport the timber to the paper mill and the tissue to the wholesalers and to the retailer. Cross-impact analysis measures the likelihood that each of these events will occur and attempts to assess the impact they will have on the future of the event of interest.

Next Forecast Friday Topic: Judgmental Bias in Forecasting

Now that we have discussed several of the judgmental forecasting techniques available to analysts, it is obvious that, unlike quantitative methods, these techniques are not objective. Because, as their name implies, judgmental forecasting methods are based on judgment, they are highly susceptible to biases. Next week’s Forecast Friday post will discuss some of the biases that can result from judgmental forecasting methods.

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